The Urban Shepherd Of Paris, And More Of The Best Photography Of The Week
PICTURE THIS

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​​​Every week, we curate the best new photography and photojournalism on the web, so you can spend your weekend kicking back and enjoying some beautiful pictures. Here are this week's picks:​


Candid Coincidences On The Streets Of NYC

https://www.instagram.com/p/B1uKpKMDTFF/

When photographer Jonathan Higbee moved to New York City, he was overwhelmed by the constant action around him. That's when he turned to his camera in order to make sense of it all and embarked on what would become a well-loved street photography project—simply and aptly called Coincidences

[See the photos at My Modern Met]


A Window Into The Life Of Indigenous Women In The Siberian Arctic

In October 2016, Alegra Ally travelled to the Yamal Peninsula in northwest Siberia, Russia, to join the indigenous Nenet tribe during their seasonal migration. Clad in hooded fur and heavy boots, every year the Nenets herd their reindeer more than 800 miles across the Arctic tundra, following the same route as their ancestors did for centuries before. 

[See the photos at British Journal of Photography]


Lost And Found

Bruce Gilden's new book, Lost and Found, is - as the title suggests - the result of a happy accident: the rediscovery of some 2000-odd rolls from his early days photographing New York City. The images made over the years spanning 1978-1984, had been relegated to filing cabinets by Gilden at the time, yet last summer - after a house move - he found them again, and said to himself, "These are pretty good, what the hell happened here?'"

[See the photos at Magnum Photos]


The Urban Shepherd Of Paris

Julie-Lou Dubreuilh has been a shepherd for seven years in Paris and its suburbs, and founded the Clinamen collective in the city. The photographer Abdulmonam Eassa spotted her flock in the French capital and went to her village to meet her.

[See the photos at The Guardian]


Life, Death And Preserving Tradition On An Estonian Island Of Only A Few Hundred People

Photographer Jeremie Jung's "Kihnu, the Estonian Isle of Traditions" is a photo documentary project about an island inhabited by only 500 people in the Baltic Sea. It is a place where the people embrace tradition, including wearing traditional clothing, speaking the local dialect and teaching their children folk traditions in school. But it is also a place that embraces modern life.

[See the photos at The Washington Post]


Photographing The Afterlives And Second Acts Of America's Movie Palaces

These movie palaces were fixtures of American cities large and small for the first half of the 20th century, providing suitably wondrous escapist backdrops to the celluloid fantasies of their screens, especially during the Great Depression of the 1930s. But by the late 1950s, as urban populations declined, seats in these huge spaces grew hard to fill, and the Hollywood studio system that had created them had also fallen apart. Some found second lives as performance and event venues, but many fell into disrepair or were demolished.

[See the photos at Atlas Obscura]

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