TAKE THE PLUNGE

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Despite the perennial excitement about space travel and traversing to other planets afar, we have barely scratched the surface when it comes to exploring our own planet, especially the deep seas. According to NOAA, eighty percent of our oceans are still "unmapped, unobserved, and unexplored."

Neal Agarwal's "The Deep Sea" gives perhaps the most comprehensive interactive tour to date of the parts of the ocean that we do know about and it's a fascinating ride to the bottom.


Beginning at just a few dozen meters below the ocean, Agarwal begins this interactive digital journey in familiar territory with manatees, Atlantic salmon and polar bears.


After a few scrolls, at over 100 meters deep, there still remains identifiable animals like killer whales and sea lions.


At over 200 meters deep, we start encountering less familiar sea creatures like the wolf eel.


And at 332 meters, we reach the deepest part of the ocean a human has ever scuba dived.


The descent continues well, well beyond 1,000 meters, reaching mind-boggling (and increasingly sparsely-populated) depths. Check out the rest here.


[Neal Agarwal]

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