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The Last House Standing, And Other Best Photography Of The Week
PICTURE THIS

Digg · Updated:

​​Every week, we curate the best new photography and photojournalism on the web, so you can spend your weekend kicking back and enjoying some beautiful pictures. Here are this week's picks:

As Time Goes By, Baltimore's Three-Story Solo Rowhouses Are Disappearing

Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin
Ben Marcin

Standing alone on vacant lots, in some of the most distressed neighborhoods, these 19th century structures were once attached to similar row houses that made up entire city blocks. Time as well as major demographic and social changes have resulted in the decay and ultimate demolition of many such blocks of row houses. Occasionally, one house is spared — literally cut off from its neighbors and left to the elements with whatever time it has left. The existence of these solitary buildings poses a number of questions, not least of which is: what happened to all of the people who lived in the houses that didn't survive?

[Read more at The Washington Post]

Quirky Photographs Taken From Inside A Mouth

The 52-year-old who lives in Bristol, explains: "I originally invented the camera for its indestructibility, throwing it off buildings etc, it was after a few months of using it this way I for some reason pushed it into my mouth. Three years of Degree level photographic theory rushed through my brain and mouthy imagery evolved."

[Read more at Design You Trust or see more photos at Justin Quinnell's Instagram page]

The Rich, Fantastical Worlds Formed By Hundreds Of Collaged Photographs

Catherine Nelson
Catherine Nelson
Catherine Nelson
Catherine Nelson
Catherine Nelson

Composed of photographs captured during three years and across four continents, "Future Memories 2020" spans "from the lush, tropical flora of Costa Rica and Far North Queensland and the fertile, volcanic mountains of the Azores, to the rolling hills of the Greenland tundra," Nelson writes. Many of the orb-like digital assemblages feature thick brush and foliage around the outside, while the less-populated centers appear to bulge out. The organic spheres hover effortlessly against a cloudy backdrop, highlighting the rich colors and incredible diversity of every environment. Each piece serves as a reminder that "it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides," the artist says.

[Read more at Colossal]

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