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IF IT AIN'T BROKE DON'T REMAKE IT

ยท Updated:

For the past two decades, Disney has been hitting us over the heads with live-action remakes of their most beloved animated classics. But how do the IMDb ratings of the remakes fare against those of the original movies?

Using data from IMDb, Reddit user Stefan0 put together a chart that compares the IMDb ratings of the original animated movies with the ratings of their recent live-action remakes, and, well, there's a clear pattern in the rating disparity between these movies.

Courtesy of Stefan0

As seen in the chart, all of the animated movies have higher IMDb ratings than their live-action counterparts, though some gaps are smaller than others. The 1967 animated version of "The Jungle Book," for example, has a 7.6 star rating, only 0.2 stars higher than the 2016 live-action version, while the recently released live-action adaptation of "Mulan" has a star rating that's 2.1 stars lower than the 1998 animated version. In fact, "Mulan" (2020), which has faced backlash for being filmed in Xinjiang, the site of many Uighur concentration camps, has the lowest star rating among Disney's live-action remakes, likely due, in part, to the significant differences between it and the original.

We'd advise Disney to stop churning out all these remakes, but, unfortunately, the trend of sequels, remakes and reboots dominating the box office is not going away any time soon.


[Via Reddit]

Pang-Chieh Ho is an editor at Digg.

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