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CORN-FED COUNTRY

· Updated:

The annual cycle of plant growth is not a mystery — plants grow in the spring and summer, and then largely stop in the winter. So while the main takeaway of this visualization shouldn't be a surprise, it is still really interesting to watch. Shared by Redditor u/BayesicallyThomas, the video shows satellite measurements of "Solar-Induced chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF), a fluorescence signal from chlorophyll that's emitted during photosynthesis" over a two year period:

The visualization drives home just how barren much of the western United States is compared to the east, and also highlights the effects of agriculture — the deep green of the Corn Belt is highly visible across the Midwest, while the rice fields along the Mississippi appear as a dead zone early in the spring before catching up later in the summer, thanks to their delayed growth cycle.


[Via Reddit]

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