Sex

'I'M TIRED OF BEING DIFFERENT'
Like many other queer writers and activists of his generation, Lou Sullivan lived a painfully short life: he died in 1991, at the age of thirty-nine, from complications related to AIDS. But he left behind a wealth of material, thirty years of diaries chronicling, in joyous detail, his emerging sense of self, his relationships, and his daily triumphs.
SOMEBODY'S WATCHING ME
Twenty years of infrequent married sex had set me up for this. We made love in his car, in the streets in my neighborhood during evening walks, in the hotels down the hill from my house. I had gone from having sex once every four months to having sex four times a week.
YOU'RE ALWAYS ON MY MIND
The science of sex is inherently paradoxical. For centuries, social stigma, prejudice and misogyny have condemned as aberrant sexual pleasures we now know are healthy. Yet despite the growing realization of how much outside views shape even our most private behavior, we can still experience the mechanics of our own desire — never mind that of others — as a fundamental mystery.
'WHY IS SEX WORK NOT UNDERSTOOD TO BE WORK?'
I understand that sex work is work because it is the work I do. I watched Lolita long before I became a sex worker, but not long before I began exchanging sex for things: something to eat, something to smoke, a place to sleep, a job opportunity.
THE PROBLEMS OF PORN AND FREEDOM

When pornography becomes a “frictionless” technology, our bodies’ task is to seamlessly and endlessly circulate.

IT MAKES YOU CRAZY

There is a conundrum at the heart of understanding how judgements work in relationships. On the one hand, we need to accurately assess whether someone is right for us because it is such an important decision. On the other, evidence suggests that we’re very bad at evaluating the qualities of the people closest to us.

VIGNETTES ABOUT AGING GRACEFULLY (?)

This diet plan requires that you eat whatever you want whenever you want to eat it, and declare yourself beautiful. We’re not going to lie — it’s really hard.

STRADDLING THE LINE

Two decades ago, a billboard went up over Salt Lake City featuring a stunning portrait of a young woman in a leotard. The woman on the billboard wasn’t a model but a gymnast on that 1992-93 team, 19-year-old sophomore Aimee Trepanier, whose pose from her floor routine was advertised as a way to sell competition tickets for the then-defending NCAA champions. But to others in Salt Lake City, the ad was selling something else: sex.

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