Histories

DON'T STOP BELIEVING
When the existence of unicorns, and the curative powers of the horns ascribed to them, began to be questioned, one Danish physician pushed back through curious means — by reframing the unicorn as an aquatic creature of the northern seas. Natalie Lawrence on a fascinating convergence of established folklore, nascent science, and pharmaceutical economy.
BUY AMERICAN, FOR AMERICA
In the wake of the September 11th attacks, George W. Bush famously told Americans to go shopping. The country was terrified, war was on the horizon and the last thing the government wanted was for fear to trigger an economic collapse.
IN ILL HEALTH
Just as today's libraries bear the century-old imprint of Andrew Carnegie, and many of today’s post offices and other public buildings are legacies of construction and mural-painting efforts launched during the Great Depression by FDR, today's remaining rural clinics are in many cases the effects of an initiative launched 50 years ago.
THE SCAM, THE MYTH, THE LEGEND
Nobody knows who did it first. Swindlers have been pulling off the scam for centuries. But it was Charles Ponzi who, in Boston in 1920, earned permanent naming rights to the scheme by dazzling the investing public and dumbfounding authorities like no other.
FUNNY AND FUNNIER

In 1994, a comedic actor previously most famous for his performances on “In Living Color” released three iconic films — “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective,” “The Mask,” and “Dumb and Dumber” — that changed Hollywood’s approach and pushed a genre to its commercial limits

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST

The Italian town Ivrea was once a model for workers’ rights and progressive design. Now, it’s both a cautionary tale and evidence of a grand experiment in making labor humane.

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